Tag Archives: make mosaic

January Sales at MakeMosaicTrace’s Online Shop!!!


I’ve decided to keep up with the (other) giants of commerce and have a JANUARY sale!!!

 

MOSAIC STEPPING STONE KITS – reduced from £34 to £28 for the whole of January!!!

DRAGONFLY Mosaic Stepping Stone Kit

DRAGONFLY Mosaic Stepping Stone Kit

Dragonfly Mosaic Stepping Stone being cast in the plastic mould

Dragonfly Mosaic Stepping Stone being cast in the plastic mould

There’s a new design in the collection – the Blue Tit designed by Rosalind Wigley, at 11 years old, the Special Edition SHEEP (reduced from £40 to £36 – its a larger format stepping stone) as well as the original collection that you can see here:

Available designs for the Mosaic Stepping Stone Kit

Available designs for the Mosaic Stepping Stone Kit

In addition to the pre-measured materials, equipment and detailed instructions included in the kit that make this process so accessible, you can watch a demo video on Youtube to see how the consistency of the mixes should look etc. Its great fun, as you can see from these Y2 youngsters having a go:

Making Mosaic Stepping Stones

Making Mosaic Stepping Stones

Also in my January sale, you can pick up any design in the collection of wall mosaic kits at the unique January price of £20!!

Bakewell Tart Mosaic Kit

Bakewell Tart Mosaic Kit

The current collection has 8 designs to choose from. The mosaics that you can make with them are 17cm x 17cm, which is the same format that I used to make these two mosaics:

Fresh as a Daisy

Fresh as a Daisy

Rubro oculo Mancunian operarius - Red-eyed Mancunian Worker (bee

Rubro oculo Mancunian operarius – Red-eyed Mancunian Worker (bee)

So, what are you waiting for? NOW is the time to get started!!!!

 

 

School Mosaic Projects: What can they provide for schools?


Children learn in different ways, for sure, but there’s clear agreement that being actively and physically engaged in an absorbing process is an ideal way for most children to learn. A mosaic project is exciting. It is very ‘hands on’, so there is little chance of distraction and every opportunity for personal expression and individuality. What’s more there is a tangible and very desirable end product – a legacy that the whole school community can enjoy for years to come – that will be an asset to the school building or school grounds.

The most popular projects that I have worked on in schools have been:

  • Mosaic Stepping Stones for paths, patios and flower beds (as in the image above)
  • Roman Mosaic Plaques (see previous post for more details)
  • Large format wall mosaics that involve lots, if not all, the school pupils
In all of these projects, whilst being creative and fully occupied, children are also learning and developing a whole range of skills. To calculate quantities of materials we use maths but most of them do this without realising! Participants have to make colour choices, listen carefully to instructions, understand safety rules, co-operate in small teams and much more. Kim Grant has made a very useful list of the learning opportunities that a mosaic project can offer to children.
The school mosaic packs have been designed for use in both primary and secondary education. The same techniques and materials can be used at each level and the tips for teachers give suggestions for differentiating accordingly, together with other practical suggestions for organising the project.
In the last few years, schools have been especially interested in improving their outside environment and this has prompted better resources becoming available to enable schools to do it themselves wherever possible. My best selling kit for schools is the Mosaic Stepping Stones Project Pack (Garden Theme) for 30. They have been popular up and down the country and I have received excellent feedback from a number of schools letting me know how pleased they’ve been with the packs. There is also a ‘refill’ for this pack so that the equipment in it can be re-used with subsequent groups.

Valerie’s Mosaic Masterpiece


Looks Great Grouted

As there wasn’t quite enough time to grout her mosaic on the day, Valerie finished her mosaic off at home. For anybody who needs longer to complete the mosaic work, we provide a take away grout kit supported by a demo during the Sunday afternoon of the Week-end Mosaic Course.

Congratulations Sophie, hope you enjoy your MakeMosaic sunflower kit!!


Congratulations Sophie! Here's your prize.

A sunflower Mosaic Wall Plaque Kit is on its way to Sophie for correctly identifying the Crown Imperial flower featured in one of our Mosaic Masterpieces from the April week-end course at Norton Priory.


Masterpieces of the April Mosaic Week-end Course


From sketch to

Finished and grouted mosaic by Leoni

from observation photo

to this completed mosaic

Prize for the first person to identify the flower in a comment to this post……..

Photos of the other pieces produced coming soon!

How to Mosaic a Garden Flower Pot – Part 1


For this project, I purchased a terracotta pot from a large chain DIY store in my area (yes, B & Q!). The first job is to seal it with diluted builder’s pva glue (mix half and half with water). Brush the pva sealant all over the surface, both inside and out.

Next, if you want to, paint the inside with acrylic paint. I used black for mine.

Use diluted pva to seal the pot and acrylic paint for the inside

Now you’re ready to start!

Decide on your design. Scratch your head a bit, have a look around for inspiration…..here’s some to help you. Simple patterns work well, either formal geometric patterns or more abstract, organic shapes. Keep it fairly simple.

If, like me, you want to create a design that requires pre-cut shapes, these have to be prepared next. Wearing safety specs, use tile nippers to shape round pieces and a tile cutter for any strips or straight lines. It is important to use frost resistant tiles or mosaic tesserae so that your pot will survive outdoors.

Pre-cut shapes for my daisy motif

Pieces of tile pre-cut to form the flower stem

You have to remember that the surface is curved. This means that any larger shapes have to be cut so that they can follow the curve. With my design, the petals were just about short enough to use whole. However I decide to divide my leaves into smaller pieces. This way, they fit around the pot following its contour and I’ve defined veins in the leaves at the same time.

Leaves

You can see from the photo that I mark the shape that I want to cut with red china marker onto the tile first. Then use the nippers to carefully cut it out.

Both flower stem and leaves follow the contour of the pot

Use a cementitious tile adhesive – I’ve used BAL Mosaic Fix for mine – to stick the pieces onto the pot. You can mix a small cupful for each small section that you work on.

Once you’ve glued down your first motif or section of pattern, clean off any excess adhesive from the surface of the mosaic pieces. If it gets left until tomorrow, it will be rock hard!

The first flower complete!

In part 2, I’ll show you how I completed and grouted my mosaic flower pot…………………..update: go to https://traceycartledge.wordpress.com/2011/07/14/daisy-daisy-make-me-a-flower-pot-do/

 

If you need supplies, you can find tile nippers, safety specs and china markers in the ‘accessories’ section of my main website: http://www.traceycartledge.co.uk/products?tags=accessories

Mosaic is fab for floors, both in and outdoors


This is the bespoke balcony mosaic floor that I have just finished making in the studio. It is a private commission and the design was evolved through conversations and the exchange of sketch design ideas and feedback with the client. As the piece gradually took shape, I texted photos to keep the client up to date with work in progress and check that they were still happy with the design.

Patience Pays


I suppose that patience is something that I’ve taken a long time to learn, or that I still am in the process of learning. Although working as an artist there’s no choice but to find some, somehow. As you start a piece of work the eagerness to see the anticipated result is overwhelming. However, it is, I think,  during the journey to the outcome that we’re really at our most creative.

On the subject of patience, here are some of the pieces being made at the evening class.  Seeing the progress being steadily made from week to week is a real inspiration to me and I admire the patience that has already gone into the creation of these fabulous mosaics…………..